Visual representations for complex ideas

A picture is worth a thousand words

English idiom

It refers to the notion that a complex idea can be conveyed with just a single still image or that an image of a subject conveys its meaning or essence more effectively than a description does.

Source: Wikipedia

 

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What is adaptive planning?

The map is not the territory.

Alfred Korzybski

We need to adapt our approach as we find unplanned obstacles.

Executing a knowledge work project is a complex, creative, and high-risk endeavor. Unlike many manufacturing projects, the work is often research-and-development-based process.

Changing environments

Una vez planteada la diferencia entre ambos tipos de proyectos, tambien vemos que es diferente la forma de planificarlos, ya que para los proyectos tradicionales tanto el entorno, como la forma de trabajo son bien conocidas y no estan sujetas a (casi) ningun tipo de cambio, en cambio en proyectos de tecnologia, ya sea por la tecnologia, el producto o las condiciones cambiantes del entorno, lo unico seguro es el cambio. Entonces vemos que la Uncertainly drives the need to replan:  our plan is to replan.

Esta forma de trabajo, se asume que estamos inmersos en un entorno cambiante, se denomina Adaptative planning, y esta basada en el convencimiento de que es imposible realizar en forma anticipada una planificacion detallada, y en cambio asume que la planificacion debe realizarse en forma iterativa adaptandose a cada uno de los sucesos que vayan apareciendo conforme avance el proyecto.

Progressive elaboration and Rolling Wave Planning

Even when both concepts sounds very similar, there are substantial base differences between both ideas.

Rolling Wave Planning is the name for the strategy of planning at multiple points in time as more information becomes available. It is the process of project planning in waves as the project moves on and more information and details become clearer.

Progressive planning is how we implement the rolling wave planning approach.

 

 

 

 

Agile Process Overview

The agile process overview shows the typical process for a generic agile project, but that process isn’t the same for lean and Kanban projects.

Lean and Kanban might not use iterations, instead of using a “pull model” to move work through the system.  They would still use demonstrations, reviews, and retrospectives, but they wouldn’t directly link the timing of these meetings to the delivery of functionality, as generic agile does at the end of each iteration.

Mike Cohen

 

Shu-Ha-Ri of Skill Mastery

Shu: Obey the rule – shu means “to keep, protect or maintain.”

Ha: Consciously moving away from the rules.- ha means “to break free”

Ri: Unconsciously finding an individual path – ri means “to go beyond or transcend”

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What es Shu-Ha-Ri?

Shuhari is a Japanese concept which details the cycle of the progress of a student in a martial art under ideal circumstances. This idea was originally presented in Tea Mastery, extended to Noh Dance (almost four centuries ago), later spread out in martial arts like aikido (in the early 1900s) and Kempo and nowadays reached out scientific or professional areas… even software engineering specifically agile development.

What is the meaning of Shu-Ha-Ri?

In Japanese, there are three types of writing: katakana, which is an “alphabet” for writing foreign words taken to Japanese; hiragana, which is typically Japanese, the most common and commonly used for any Japanese word. Kanji are ideograms from Chinese, in simple terms is a symbol representing an idea or object.

Shu-Ha-Ri, it is a word made with kanji, and for that reason it can be broken down into its component parts.

Shu: In this beginning stage the student follows the teachings of one master precisely. He concentrates on how to do the task, without worrying too much about the underlying theory. If there are multiple variations on how to do the task, he concentrates on just the one way his master teaches him. No excuses, no exceptions.

Ha: At this point, the student begins to branch out. With the basic practices working he now starts to learn the underlying principles and theory behind the technique. He also starts learning from other masters and integrates that learning into his practice. You don’t sweat every little ceremony. 

Ri: The student stops learning from others but from his own practice. He creates his own approaches and adapts what he’s learned to his own particular circumstances. You don’t think about the rules anymore; instead, you just build awesome things.

What is the idea behind this concept?

The fundamental idea here is that when someone learn an art, first need to completely understand the reason why behind each concept and idea, follow each ceremony and step required and later when he/she dominate the art and the way to do the things are completely ingrained, just in that moment, the student could stop to imitate others and avoid the strict adherence to the path laid, starting to develop his/her personal way to do the things.

Early stages of learning focus on concrete steps to imitate, (as long as the student advances in the domain of discipline) the focus shifts to understanding principles to self-directed innovation.

How it is applied to software development?

This concept was introduced by Alistair Cockburn first via his blog (http://alistair.cockburn.us/Shu+Ha+Ri) and later in his book  after that, it spread out in agile development.

In general terms, the idea is to deeply understand the methodology first and later tailoring the process. A practical implementation of Shuhari in agile development happen when a team is new and want to implement an agile process. The best moment to tailor something is after several uses of the basic and complete methodology just out of the box, without any change, and later when the team has a real comprehension about the reason why behind each process and ceremony, just in that moment the team could create their own variations.

References:

The beauty of the measurement

The beauty of the performance measurements is that “You get what you measure”. The problem with performance measurements is that: “You get only what you measure, nothing else”. You tend to lose the things that you can’t measure: insight, collaboration, creativity, dedication to customer satisfaction.

Robert Austin

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Establishing a common ground for teams: Definition of Done

If the definition of “done” for an increment is part of the conventions, standards or guidelines of the development organization, all Scrum Teams must follow it as a minimum. If “done” for an increment is not a convention of the development organization, the Development Team of the Scrum Team must define a definition of “done” appropriate for the product. If there are multiple Scrum Teams working on the system or product release, the development teams on all of the Scrum Teams must mutually define the definition of “Done.”

Theory of the constraints applied to projects

Changes to most of the variables in an organization usually have only small impacts on global performance. There are few variables (perhaps only one) for which a significant change in local performance will effect a significant change in global performance.

Eli Goldratt

Pagina 121

A veces es complicado darse cuenta en el dia a dia de los proyectos, que tal como lo enuncia Goldratt, existe muy pocas variables que realmente generan un gran cambio.

Tambien cuando leo este enunciado encuentro muchas similitudes con la Regla de Pareto 80%-20%, lo cual me lleva a considerar que en muchos casos la modificacion de pequenas variables, la accion de actividades claves es la que hace la diferencia.

Reference:

  • PMI-ACP Exam Prep by Mike Griffiths

Blink

Este libro fue escrito por Malcolm Gladwell, periodista y divulgador cientifico.

Trata sobre el contenido y el origen de esas impresiones y conclusiones instantáneas que surgen de forma espontánea cuando conocemos a alguien, cuando afrontamos una situación difícil o cuando tenemos que decidir algo en condiciones de estrés.

El libro se divide en 6 capitulos, en cada uno de ellos se presenta un concepto y distintas situaciones que sirven para mostrar dicha idea:

  • Capitulo 1, La estatua que tenia algo raro, trata no solo acerca del Kuros del Museo X, sino tambien acerca del matrimonio y las relaciones, asi como tambien acerca de las demandas por negligencia.
  • Capitulo 2,  La puerta cerrada, trata acerca de la necesidad humana de explicar lo inexplicable a traves de tres casos
  • Capitulo 3, El error de Warren Harding,
  • Capitulo 4, La gran victoria de Paul Van Riper,
  • Capitulo 5, El dilema de Kenna, donde trata acerca del desafio Pepsi vs. Coca-Cola
  • Capitulo 6, Siete segundos en el Bronx, donde ademas de presentarnos la historia de … nos comenta un poco mas acerca de los enganos.
  • Y el capitulo final, conclusion: como escuchar con los ojos.

Es un libro que tiene 2 grandes puntos fuertes, por empezar es un libro de facil lectura, ameno, que nos cuenta historia tras historia, pero al mismo tiempo, es un libro que nos presenta distintas teorias e hipotesis acerca de como pensamos, de nuestras primeras impresiones, y de porque funcionamos en esa forma.

El otro de los puntos fuertes del libro es su anexo, conteniendo  las referencias hacia otras fuentes para profundizar cada uno de los temas. Cada una de las historias se encuentra bien documentada y que sirve como trampolin hacia otras investigaciones.

Como punto debil, y tal vez por la necesidad de mantener un balance entre ser ameno y al mismo tiempo cientifico, el libro pasa muy rapidamente por cada historia sin profundizar demasiado.

 

Inventing rather than researching

Inventing rather than researching

Alistair Cockburn | Agile Software Development : The cooperative Game, 2nd Edition

In the book Agile Software Development, Cockburn developed some ideas about the human side of performance and process. The five failure modes identified by him are:

  1. Making mistakes
  2. Preferring to fail conservatively
  3. Inventing rather than researching
  4. Being creatures of habit
  5. Being inconsistent

De todos, el que mas quedo en mi mente porque haberlo visto en numerosas oportunidades es: “Inventing rather than researching”(*).

Este concepto aplica a todos esos casos donde en vez de investigar si existe una solucion para el problema que enfrentamos, buscamos inventar nuevas formas de hacer las cosas, lo cual es excelente pero en terminos generales es mas costoso en tiempo, esfuerzo e implica mayor probabilidad de errores.

Como decia mi profesor de Base de datos: “la rueda ya esta inventada senores”, sin oponerse a la innovacion, se oponia a la perdida de tiempo de crear una solucion que ya existe, en vez de invertir ese tiempo en buscar la mejor forma de implementar la solucion.  Si ya sabemos que existe la rueda entonces, porque no invertir ese tiempo en determinar si para solucionar el problema necesitamos una rueda mas grande, mas chica, de un determinado material.

(*) Una de las cosas que mas me maravilla de leer un libro, especialmente uno referente al ámbito donde uno se desarrolla profesionalmente, es encontrar reflejado en palabras escritas ideas y situaciones que uno percibe pero no ha llegado a verbalizar, ese preciso momento en el que uno encuentra no solo la idea sino que podemos ver reflejado nuestro pensamiento en el pensamiento del autor es uno de esos momentos mágicos por los que vale la abrir un libro.

Creative destruction: When new industries rise and replace old ones

Creative destruction refers to the incessant product and process innovation mechanism by which new production units replace outdated ones.

Joseph Schumpeter

In these days we are reading news about Macys is closing stores and eliminating jobs, but at the same time Amazon announces the creation of 100,000 new jobs, is inevitable to notice the contrast between the two scenes which are a real example of “creative destruction,” the inevitable process in which new industries rise and replace old ones.

The original concept was formulated originatelly in 1942 by Schumpeter, and was perfected after 53 years by Clayton Christensen who formulated the theory of the disruptive innovation, intrinsically related with creative destruction.

Disruptive innovation describes a process by which a product or service takes root initially in simple applications at the bottom of a market and then relentlessly moves up market, eventually displacing established competitors.

Clayton Christensen

 

Moving away from theory and approaching to our daily life, it is particularly strinking to see companies that 20 years ago did not exist be active and necessaries participants in our life mentioning for example Amazon, Uber, Airbnb

All these changes occur because new industries are created, with thousands of jobs, but at the same time they destroy innumerable companies and jobs.

In general and totally abstract terms, the economy as a whole benefits from creative destruction, because greater productivity is essential for long-term economic growth, where a new business idea displaces other existing but less efficient ones.

In singular terms, it is necessary to analyze what happens both with the companies and  laid-ofemployees.

This is the paradox of progress in an economy: it is to be witnesses of creative destruction and disruptive innovation live.
It is totally unpredictable how innovation will transform the world in the next 50 years and what it means for us.